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Latest News

Clayton County NAACP & Others to Host Vapor Intrusion Community Forum for Fort Gillem Area Residents

MEDIA ADVISORY

For More Information, Contact:
C. Synamon Baldwin: (404) 424-6567 President, Clayton County NAACP Stephanie
Stuckey Benfield: (404) 964-7025 Executive Director, GreenLaw

What: A community forum to engage stakeholders and residents in the Fort Gillem Community on issues related to groundwater contamination from the military base. The forum will encourage transparent and open dialogue with community members to answer questions they may have about interpreting test results, how hazardous wastes migrate through ground water, what causes vapor intrusion, health impacts, home values, cleanup efforts, etc.

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Representative Able Mable Thomas, the only African American that serves on the Natural Resources and Environment Committee in the State of Georgia

MEDIA ADVISORY

For more information contact:
Saffie A. Jallow: (678) 983 - 1585

Representative Able Mable Thomas, House District 56, will hold a community forum to educate constituents on cost-saving energy efficiency programs. Representative Thomas is a leader on environmental and energy issues in Georgia and is the only African American state representative to serve on the House Natural Resources and Environment Committee.

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GWC Names 2014 "Dirty Dozen"

GWC Dirty Dozen MapExposing 12 of the Worst Offenses to Georgia's Waters

Today, Georgia’s leading water coalition named its “Dirty Dozen” for 2014, highlighting 12 of the worst offenses to Georgia’s waters. The annual Dirty Dozen shines a spotlight on threats to Georgia’s water resources as well as the polluters and state policies or failures that ultimately harm—or could harm—Georgia property owners, downstream communities, fish and wildlife, hunters and anglers, and boaters and swimmers.
 
“The Dirty Dozen is not a list of the most polluted water bodies in Georgia, nor are they ranked in any particular order,” said Joe Cook, Advocacy & Communication Coordinator at the Coosa River Basin Initiative.  "It’s a list of problems that exemplify the results of inadequate funding for Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division (EPD), a lack of political will to enforce existing environmental protections, and ultimately misguided water planning and spending priorities that flow from the very top of Georgia’s leadership.”

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GreenLaw Launches Campaign to Promote the Cause of Environmental Justice

Public service campaign premieres Oct. 21 to spotlight threat to ‘lives and livelihoods’

Arguing that equal protection under the law applies to environmental justice, GreenLaw Executive Director Stephanie Stuckey Benfield says the legal challenge to ensure environmental justice for all Georgians is the primary concern of the organization.

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New Analysis Shows Moving Beyond Coal to Clean Energy Will Cut Carbon and Boost Georgia’s Economy

Shutterfly Coal StacksThe Sierra Club and GreenLaw have announced a new analysis that lays out how Georgia can meet the proposed cuts to carbon pollution while creating jobs, lowering power costs and promoting clean air and water. Georgia has established itself as a regional leader in solar power production in recent years, will soon import low-cost wind power and has already taken strong first steps in phasing out 15 coal and oil-fired units at power plants across the state. GreenLaw and the Sierra Club released the analysis today as the Georgia General Assembly holds its scheduled hearing on the Clean Power Plan and its impacts on Georgia.

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